1) Reading about interviews isn't a substitute for subject preperation. Read them for guidance but remember to do the work and know your subject materials.

2) Someone else's experience will not necessarily reflect your own. Most interviews are more like conversations than tests and, like any conversation, they can be highly personal.

Law | Sidney Sussex College | 2015

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Interview details

Application outcome: succesfulDirect
Interview type: directInterview

Interview format

1x interview; 1x test

Interview content

Discussion about case given before interview, academic experience so far

Advice in hindsight

It's not based on prior knowledge; don't be nervous

Best preparation

Books & online resources, practice essay writing

Final thoughts

Nope

Something missing?

1) Reading about interviews isn't a substitute for knowledge. Read them for guidance but remember to do the work and know your subject materials.

2) Someone else's experience will not necessarily reflect your own. Most interviews are more like conversations than tests and like, any conversation, they can be highly personal.

Remember this advice isn't official and there is no guarantee it will reflect your experience. The Cambridge application has changed in recent years to reflect the new A-Level system. Check the official Cambridge website for more accurate information on this year's application format and the required tests.

Read our subject resource guide for Law. Keep an eye out for new interviews, we are adding them daily.

Interview Format​

Interview with two fellows; written exam comprising of two essays

Interview content

My interview was in early December. I had arrived the evening before as my interview was early in the morning. I was given a case study to prepare about 20 minutes before the interview, which was structured like a problem question that we get in our course, describing a fictional situation to see what my knowledge or intention regarding the relevant law was. No prior legal knowledge was expected, the two fellows interviewing just wanted to hear me talk through my thought process in approaching the facts. My personal background and academic history were also discussed.

Some hours later, I had a written exam comprising of two essays. Again, the questions were similar to what one might expect during a law degree, but the focus was, I believe, more on how I approached writing the essays rather than my substantive knowledge.

Advice in hindsight

Not necessarily; I feel that it is important to remember that no knowledge of the law is required, and that fellows are not trying to trip up applicants at the interview. There is no need to be nervous about the process.

Best preparation

Everyone will tell you to read 'What About Law?', written by several Cambridge fellows, and I can only agree. It is a great introduction to the law, and especially to teaching at Cambridge.

I would also suggest that applicants follow blogs such as 'Public Law for Everyone', also by a Cambridge professor, to keep up to date with legal developments and become familiar with legal analysis.

In the weeks leading up to my interview, I also made a point of writing one essay a day - not necessarily about legal topics, but just to get used to writing under timed conditions. I recommend this strategy, though it is possibly one of the more time-consuming ways to prepare.

Final thoughts

Nope!

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